Application deadline approaching for Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife (CROW) veterinary internship…

Each year, CROW’s non-profit hospital and rehabilitation center provides care for ~ 4,000 patients representing over 200 species of native and migratory birds, mammals, and reptiles (including sea turtles) on Southwest Florida’s Gulf Coast. Our mission is to advance the health, welfare, and conservation of wildlife through research, education, and cutting edge medical and surgical care. The program is one year in duration. Two positions are available; one through the VIRMP that starts on July 1 and one outside the match that starts on January 1 of every year. The deadline is October 15, 2017 for the January 1, 2018 start position. Interested applicants should send a letter of intent, CV, and three letters of reference to hbarron@crowclinic.org.  For more information about this program and CROW, please visit http://crowclinic.org/articles/student-programs.

Annual NYSWRC Seminar coming up in November…

Culminating its year-long efforts to support the rehabilitator in the field, the New York State Wildlife Rehabilitation Council is sponsoring an Annual Wildlife Rehabilitation Seminar from November 10-12, 2017 in Binghamton, NY. The weekend-long educational event is designed to help the beginner and advanced rehabilitator, as well as the interested veterinarian or veterinary technician. Continuing education is available.

Animal Disease Emergency Response online course offering…

The Center for Food Security and Public Health (CFSPH) at Iowa State University College of Veterinary Medicine will offer a web-based course, Animal Disease Emergencies: Understanding the Response, September 20-30, 2017. The cost for the course is $100 and it has been approved by AAVSB-RACE for four hours of continuing education. To find out more and to register, visit http://www.cfsph.iastate.edu/ADE-Course/.

An Opening Statement from the AAWV President, Mark Drew

Hello to all AAWV Members! I am honored to step into the role of President of AAWV, trying to follow in the able footsteps of Peregrine Wolff and Colin Gillin. I will be joined in the executive council by Vice President Tom Deliberto, Treasurer Jenn Ballard, and Secretary Lisa Shender. Peregrine Wolff will be retained as Immediate Past President and will head the Advisory Council. Members of that council will be determined in the near future. Other people that will be in the forefront include Clair Butkus, AAWV Student Representative to the Advisory Council and Ann Justice-Allen, Newsletter editor. As the organization progresses forward, my goals are to make the AAWV valuable for members in both contacts and content. You will have noticed the new and shiny website that was put together by Andrew Di Salvo; look for some changes to the newsletter with added content to the website. Please also check the website for news about student travel awards to US Animal Health Association and WDA conferences, as well as nominations for the Tom Thorne and Beth Williams Memorial Award, as well as the Al Franzmann Memorial Speaker. Our affiliation with other veterinary organizations remains one of our biggest challenges, largely from trying to make the voice of wildlife veterinarians heard. We have allied organization status with the US Animal Health Association and the American Veterinary Medical Association. We have a long-standing working agreement with the American Association of Zoo Veterinarians with whom we share several representatives to various AVMA Committees and the House of Delegates Advisory Board. If you are interested in any of these endeavors, please contact me or one of the officers. We greatly need the involvement of members in these activities. I would also ask that those of you who use social media to please contact Claire so that we can harness the power of these information avenues to our members. You should have also been reminded to renew your membership – if you have not done it yet, please take the time to do it now. I will try to communicate with you monthly if at all possible. If you have concerns about the organization or things that may impact wildlife veterinary medicine, please contact me. Cheers.

Workshops at TWS’s 2017 Annual Conference

The Wildlife Society is offering up many exciting workshops during their annual conference, but two in particular are perfect for any AAWV member…

Free-Ranging Wildlife Health, Disease and Mortality Investigation – From Outbreaks to Surveillance
Bat White-Nose Syndrome: Best Practices for Surveillance and Management


Workshop registration requires a fee in addition to the general conference registration fee. Visit http://twsconference.org/ for more details.

Attention Veterinary Students! Apply for a $1,000 travel award to attend the 2017 USAHA Annual Meeting

The USAHA Executive Committee recognizes the importance of engaging young leaders in the work of USAHA and its diverse membership. For this reason, AAWV and USAHA are once again partnering to offer a $1,000 travel award for a veterinary student to attend USAHA’s 2017 Annual Meeting. This year’s meeting will be held October 12-18 in San Diego, CA.

Application instructions: USAHA_TravelAward_2017

For more information on the meeting, visit http://www.usaha.org/2017-annual-meeting

AAWV-WDA Joint Annual Meeting

San Cristóbal de las Casas, Mexico
July 23-28, 2017

Anne Justice-Allen

The meeting literally started off with a bang, and the fireworks punctuated several of the presentations throughout the conference – the city was celebrating one of several Saint’s days. After the opening ceremony by outgoing president Marcie Uhart, we were welcomed to San Cristóbal by Gerardo Suzán, from Kalaan-Kab and the Latin American Section of the WDA, our gracious host for the meeting.

Continue reading “AAWV-WDA Joint Annual Meeting”

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Draft CWD Risk Minimization Plan for New York

Call for Comments

The NYS Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has great concern about the potential impacts of Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) should the disease enter or spread within New York, and we emphasize that comprehensive and robust disease prevention is the most cost-effective and sensible approach to protect our wild deer and moose and captive deer and elk from CWD.  You may have seen our press release earlier this week announcing a Draft CWD Risk Minimization Plan for New York.  The draft plan is available at http://www.dec.ny.gov/animals/7191.html.  We welcome your review and comment.