Student Mentors Needed for Upcoming WDA Conference!

The Student Committee for the 2022 International Wildlife Disease Association Conference is seeking mentors! If you are a wildlife professional planning to attend the conference in Madison next month, please consider participating to help students learn about the variety of wildlife careers that are out there. The student-mentor mixer is scheduled for Tuesday, July 26 from 5:30-6:30pm. For more details, click here.

ACZM Introductory Workshop at Upcoming WDA Conference…

The American College of Zoological Medicine’s Education Committee and Ad Hoc Wildlife Committee will sponsor an introductory workshop at the 70th International Wildlife Disease Association Conference in Madison, WI. This workshop is for veterinarians who may be interested in pursuing board certification in zoological medicine. Free-living wildlife population health is one of the areas of emphasis within ACZM and the workshop will focus on, and feature speakers from, this area. Information on ACZM, the training required to qualify for the examination, examination preparation and format, how to study and how to analyze articles for potential examination questions content will be included. Recognizing that there may be a number of misconceptions and/or some apprehension, there will be plenty of time for questions and discussion. This is a full day workshop with refreshment breaks and lunch included, and is approved for 6 CE credits.

More information can be found in the announcement.

9th International Conference on Wildlife Fertility Control…

The 9th International Conference on Wildlife Fertility Control, hosted by the Botstiber Institute for Wildlife Fertility Control, will take place from May 23 – 25, 2022 at the Cheyenne Mountain Resort in Colorado Springs, Colorado.

Registration for the conference is now open. Registration includes access to all conference organized sessions, oral and poster presentations, a welcome reception, and meals.

Click here for more details.

Call for Applicants: Free-Ranging Wildlife Health Residency

The Karen C. Drayer Wildlife Health Center at the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine and the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) Wildlife Health Laboratory are accepting applications for a residency position in free-ranging wildlife health, beginning August 1, 2022.

This is a 3-year residency, which includes enrollment in the UC Davis Masters in Preventive Medicine Program; for applicants who already have a comparable advanced degree in epidemiology, a 2-year clinical and research option is possible.

Work will involve extensive local and statewide travel. The resident will contribute to clinical and didactic teaching of veterinary students.

Upon successful completion, the resident will partially (or wholly, depending on prior work experience) fulfill requirements for sitting the American College of Zoological Medicine (ACZM) board-certification examination.

For more information on qualifications and how to apply, click here.

Dr. Gregory D. Bossart Memorial One Health Scholarship…

A $5,000 USD Dr. Greg Bossart Memorial Scholarship is available to a graduate student in wildlife biology, epidemiology, veterinary, medical, public health, basic or social sciences or other post-graduate program focusing on the interconnection between people, animals, plants, and their shared environment using a One Health framework. The submission deadline is October 10, 2021 and funds will be awarded in November 2021.

Greg Bossart, DVM, Ph.D. was a highly respected veterinarian, pathologist, and conservationist committed to advancing the understanding of marine mammals as sentinels of ocean and human health. With a career spanning 30 years and over 200 publications, Dr. Bossart identified resurgent and emerging diseases in dolphins, manatees, birds, and whales. His research and innovative techniques helped characterize the first viral diseases in manatees and he was responsible for developing the first immunohistochemical technique for diagnosing brevetoxicosis (red tide poisoning) in both marine mammals and birds.

Dr. Bossart was a dedicated proponent of the One Health concept and approach which was a prominent theme in his long-running Atlantic bottlenose dolphin Health and Environmental Risk Assessment (HERA) project. Started in 2003, HERA was developed to monitor how dolphin health in coastal habitats is impacted by environmental stressors and how those stressors potentially also impact human health. His contributions to the study of marine mammal health are far-reaching, and through this scholarship, Georgia Aquarium is committed to honoring Dr. Bossart’s One Health legacy.

For eligibility, requirements, and application instructions, click here.